For Granada Hills yoga instructor, the outdoors have been great – Daily News


Amid the coronavirus pandemic, Christine LaMonica of Prema Flow Yoga in Granada Hills has been forced to go with the flow.

LaMonica’s business in Chatsworth Street has been among many yo-yo-ings opened and closed in recent months in response to public health orders from Sacramento as coronavirus cases rise and fall.

Initially, after being forced to close her studio, she moved her “flow yoga” classes – tapping movement and relating breathing to movement – to Zoom Online.

  • Christine LaMonica is taking her Prema yoga studio to Northridge Park on Tuesday August 11, 2020 where she is teaching a class after realizing that not all of her clients are turning into Zoom classes during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Christine LaMonica is taking her Prema yoga studio to Northridge Park on Tuesday August 11, 2020 where she is teaching a class after realizing that not all of her clients are turning into Zoom classes during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Clarita Pentreath, of Granada Hills, attends Christine LaMonica’s Prema Yoga class at Northridge Park on Tuesday, August 11, 2020 during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • A cyclist walks past Wendy Garcia of Northridge as she takes Christine LaMonica’s Prema yoga class at Northridge Park on Tuesday, August 11, 2020. LaMonica began teaching in the park after realizing that everyone its clients weren’t turning to Zoom courses during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Christine LaMonica is taking her Prema yoga studio to Northridge Park on Tuesday August 11, 2020 where she is teaching a class after realizing that not all of her clients are turning into Zoom classes during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

  • Christine LaMonica is closing her Prema Yoga studio on Chatsworth Street in Granada Hills where she cannot teach during the coronavirus pandemic. LaMonica runs Zoom classes and has classes at Northridge Park for customers who do not take their Zoom classes during the pandemic. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News / SCNG)

When a notable portion of her clients weren’t warming up to this medium, she decided to hold classes in a nearby park, where a light breeze blows under shade trees on those hot summer days.

“We had a brief opportunity to reopen again, which didn’t last very long,” said LaMonica. “When we closed the second time around we were really looking for a way to stay in touch with the students… and I know some students can’t or don’t like going online or it doesn’t work for them. for whatever reason. “

LaMonica said she still offers on-demand videos, but students she hasn’t seen in a while prefer to show up at the park.

“It’s just a really nice way for us to connect with the community and give the students the opportunity to practice and we’re out in the grass,” she said. “It’s really nice to be outside under the trees and the sky. It’s nice and calm and there’s a breeze and you don’t really notice (the heat). ”

While it may not have worked for LaMonica, digital options have allowed other fitness companies to reinvent themselves. It is not known, however, whether current business practices will continue after the pandemic.

“I think social media is a great way to build brand awareness, and I think it’s a fantastic way to build community from a marketing standpoint,” said Kristen Walker, Professor of Marketing at the Nazarian College of Business and Economics at California State Northridge and director of the MBA program.

Walker says businesses not only need potential customers to be aware of this, but it’s critical that customers are engaged and driven through the “funnel” of online transactions that allow businesses to take them to where they need to go. want to go. Meanwhile, other people just want to get back to the lifestyles of consumers before the outbreak.

“When the COVID19 stay-at-home orders came up, we couldn’t go out and do yoga,” Walker said, “a lot of them went to offer classes on YouTube. So you interact with your customers that way.

But Walker added, “Now we can go out and there are different stages of small business response like a yoga studio. So now how do they promote this? “

It’s unclear whether our spending habits will really return to normal, Walker said.

“Right now it’s all very uncomfortable,” she said. “The uncertainty is very high and we are trying to create our new level of comfort. The interactions are going to change because all of our experiences are going to be different.